• Music
    • CDs
    • Vinyl
  • Movies
    • DVD
    • Blu-Ray
    • 3D Blu-Ray
  • Events
  • Blog
  • About
    • Contact us
    • My Account
    • Locations/Hours
    • Newsletter Signup
    • Gift Cards
    • Our Blog
    • Help
    • Rewards Program
    • We Buy Used!
    • Privacy Policy
    • FAQs
  • Menu
    • Music
      • CDs
      • Vinyl
    • Movies
      • DVD
      • Blu-Ray
      • 3D Blu-Ray
    • Events
    • Blog
  • About
    • Contact us
    • My Account
    • Locations/Hours
    • Newsletter Signup
    • Gift Cards
    • Our Blog
    • Help
    • Rewards Program
    • We Buy Used!
    • Privacy Policy
    • FAQs
  • Menu
    • Music
      • CDs
      • Vinyl
    • Movies
      • DVD
      • Blu-Ray
      • 3D Blu-Ray
    • Events
    • Blog
    • About
      • Contact us
      • My Account
      • Locations/Hours
      • Newsletter Signup
      • Gift Cards
      • Our Blog
      • Help
      • Rewards Program
      • We Buy Used!
      • Privacy Policy
      • FAQs
 

Tonino Benacquista

The Family

Tonino Benacquista The Family
$12.99 New
$4.99 Pre-owned
This item is not available at this time.
Low stock - should ship today

Add To Basket




Biographical note:

Tonino Benacquista was born in France in 1961 to Italian immigrants. He is the acclaimed author of several novels, including The Thursday Night Club, as well as film scripts and graphic novels. He lives in France.

Excerpt from book:

“Maggie, make me some tea!”

Fred had shouted loud enough from the veranda to wake Malavita, who gave a little growl and went straight back to sleep. Maggie heard, too, but felt no sense of urgency, and remained slumped in front of the television screen in the bedroom. Fred, irritated by the lack of response, risked losing the thread of his inspiration, and left the typewriter.

“Didn’t you hear me?”

Lying back on the bed, annoyed by her husband’s intrusion just at the denouement of the soap plot, she paused the cassette.

“Don’t play the macho Italian with me, will you?”

“But . . . I’m working, sweetie . . .”

Maggie had to suppress her irritation at the word “working,” irritation which had been mounting ever since they had arrived in Cholong a month earlier.

“Might we know what it is you’re doing with that typewriter?”

“I’m writing.”

“Don’t fuck with me, Giovanni.”

She only used his real name in extreme situations, either very tense or very tender ones. He was going to have to confess to what he had been doing on the veranda from 10 a.m. onwards, bent over a bakelite antique, and explain to them the full urgency of this project which had filled him with such unusual energy and plunged him into such delicious confusion.

“You can make fools of the neighbours if you like, but please spare me and your kids.”

“I’ve TOLD you, I’m WRITING, for Christ’s sake!”

“You can hardly even read! You couldn’t even write down the things you say! The neighbour at number five told me you were hatching something about the Normandy landings! I had to nod like an idiot . . . The landings? You don’t even know who Eisenhower was!”

“Fuck the landings, Maggie. That was just a pretext. I’m writing something else.”

“Might I know what?”

“My memoirs.”

At that, Maggie realized that all was lost. She had known her husband for ever, and now it seemed he was no longer the man she had known a month ago, the man whose every gesture and intonation she knew by heart, and understood.

And yet Fred wasn’t lying. He had, with no regard for chronology, been going back, as the whim took him, over the happiest period of his life, the thirty years he had spent at the heart of the New York Mafia, and then the most painful – the time when he turned government witness. Captain Thomas Quintiliani had, after tracking him for four years, succeeded in cornering clan boss Giovanni Manzoni, and had forced him to testify at a trial which had brought down three of the biggest gang leaders, the capi who controlled the East Coast. One of them was Don Mimino, capo di tutti i capi, the head of all the “five families” in New York.

There had followed the period of the Witness Protection Programme, “WITSEC,” those stinking arrangements that supposedly protected those who had snitched from reprisals. Reliving the most shameful moments of one’s existence was no doubt the price anyone would have to pay for embarking on the writing of their memoirs. Fred would have to spell out every letter of every forbidden word: snitching, flipping, ratting out on your friends, condemning the oldest of them to sentences ten times their great ages and a thousand times their life expectancy (Don Mimino had copped three hundred and fifty-one years, a number ev

The internationally bestselling novel originally published as Malavitasoon to be the major motion picture The Family starring Robert De Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Tommy Lee Jones, directed by Luc Besson, and produced by Martin Scorsese

The Blakes are newcomers to a small town in Normandy. Fred is a historian researching the Allied landings, Maggie enjoys charity work, and their kids are looking forward to meeting other teenagers at the local lycée. Or so it seems.

In fact, Fred is really Giovanni Manzoni, an ex-goodfella turned stool pigeon who’s been relocated from New Jersey to France by the FBI’s witness protection program. He’s got a two-million-dollar bounty on his head, but he and his family can’t help attracting attention (imagine the Sopranos in Normandy). And when imprisoned mobster Don Mimino gets wind of their location, it’s Mafia mayhem à la Josh Bazell’s Beat the Reaper, or like The Godfather as if written by Carl Hiaasen. Because while you can take the man out of the Mafia, you can’t take the Mafia out of the man.

  •  

Connect With Us