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Music  >>  Vinyl  >>  Dance

C-Schulz

10. Hose Horn

C Schulz 10. Hose Horn
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A bit of context for the making of this record: C-Schulz pronounces the title of the record 10. Hose Horn in German, as all the other titles and credits on the record are German, “Hose,” in German, means “trouser.” “10.” is an index for a 10th part of an imaginary series, which makes the record the first in an open-ended, non-consecutive row. Obviously, in some scales, the digit “10” is the maximum value. This index is maybe also a programmatic token to the trope of the collection, the archive, stock-footage and library-music for film, that Carsten was, and maybe is, fascinated by. It could be seen as an implicit gesture, these indexes represent a multitude of potentially interchangeable musical styles, combined with weirdly anachronistic genre-descriptions. This flirt with the idea of a retrospective archive may account for an emancipation from an anticipated upcoming of the affirmative techno-culture in Germany. In the aftermath of the recording, C-Schulz and I became even more obsessed with sound libraries, be it sound FX from film-foley, as well as ethnographic recordings of all sorts that we could examine as interesting sources for sound-manipulations, and that we kept track of in a book (and of course we're speaking about pre-internet-times). Today, 10. Hose Horn still holds as a document for a specific moment, with an idiosyncratic narrative, wildly liberating illustrative concrete-sounds and generic music-materials from their respective codes. Instead this toys with the materials’ acoustic properties and their contingent dramaturgical functions in a wonderfully strange new context.
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