• Music
    • CDs
    • Vinyl
  • Movies
    • DVD
    • Blu-Ray
    • 3D Blu-Ray
  • Events
  • Blog
  • About
    • Contact us
    • My Account
    • Locations/Hours
    • Newsletter Signup
    • Gift Cards
    • Our Blog
    • Help
    • Rewards Program
    • We Buy Used!
    • Privacy Policy
    • FAQs
  • Menu
    • Music
      • CDs
      • Vinyl
    • Movies
      • DVD
      • Blu-Ray
      • 3D Blu-Ray
    • Events
    • Blog
  • About
    • Contact us
    • My Account
    • Locations/Hours
    • Newsletter Signup
    • Gift Cards
    • Our Blog
    • Help
    • Rewards Program
    • We Buy Used!
    • Privacy Policy
    • FAQs
  • Menu
    • Music
      • CDs
      • Vinyl
    • Movies
      • DVD
      • Blu-Ray
      • 3D Blu-Ray
    • Events
    • Blog
    • About
      • Contact us
      • My Account
      • Locations/Hours
      • Newsletter Signup
      • Gift Cards
      • Our Blog
      • Help
      • Rewards Program
      • We Buy Used!
      • Privacy Policy
      • FAQs
 

John Grisham

The Racketeer

John Grisham The Racketeer
$8.99 New
$3.99 Pre-owned
This item is not available at this time.
Low stock - should ship today

Add To Basket




Biographical note:

John Grisham is the author of twenty-five novels; one work of nonfiction; a collection of stories; and a series for young readers. The recipient of the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction, he is also the chairman of the board of directors of the Mississippi Innocence Project at the University of Mississippi School of Law. He lives in Virginia and Mississippi.

Country of final manufacture:

US

Excerpt from book:

CHAPTER 1

I am a lawyer, and I am in prison. It's a long story.

I'm forty-three years old and halfway through a ten-year sentence handed down by a weak and sanctimonious federal judge in Washington, D.C. All of my appeals have run their course, and there is no procedure, mechanism, obscure statute, technicality, loophole, or Hail Mary left in my thoroughly depleted arsenal. I have nothing. Because I know the law, I could do what some inmates do and clog up the courts with stacks of worthless motions and writs and other junk filings, but none of this would help my cause. Nothing will help my cause. The reality is that I have no hope of getting out for five more years, save for a few lousy weeks chopped off at the end for good behavior, and my behavior has been exemplary.

I shouldn't call myself a lawyer, because technically I am not. The Virginia State Bar swept in and yanked my license shortly after I was convicted. The language is right there in black and white--a felony conviction equals disbarment. I was stripped of my license, and my disciplinary troubles were duly reported in the Virginia Lawyer Register. Three of us were disbarred that month, which is about average.

However, in my little world, I am known as a jailhouse lawyer and as such spend several hours each day helping my fellow inmates with their legal problems. I study their appeals and file motions. I prepare simple wills and an occasional land deed. I review contracts for some of the white-collar guys. I have sued the government for legitimate complaints but never for ones I consider frivolous. And there are a lot of divorces.

Eight months and six days after I began my time, I received a thick envelope. Prisoners crave mail, but this was one package I could have done without. It was from a law firm in Fairfax, Virginia, one that represented my wife, who, surprisingly, wanted a divorce. In a matter of weeks, Dionne had gone from being a supportive wife, dug in for the long haul, to a fleeing victim who desperately wanted out. I couldn't believe it. I read the papers in absolute shock, my knees rubbery and my eyes wet, and when I was afraid I might start crying, I hustled back to my cell for some privacy. There are a lot of tears in prison, but they are always hidden.

When I left home, Bo was six years old. He was our only child, but we were planning more. The math is easy, and I've done it a million times. He'll be sixteen when I get out, a fully grown teenager, and I will have missed ten of the most precious years a father and son can have. Until they are about twelve years old, little boys worship their fathers and believe they can do no wrong. I coached Bo in T-ball and youth soccer, and he followed me around like a puppy. We fished and camped, and he sometimes went to my office with me on Saturday mornings, after a boys-only breakfast. He was my world, and trying to explain to him that I was going away for a long time broke both our hearts. Once behind bars, I refused to allow him to visit me. As much as I wanted to squeeze him, I could not stand the thought of that little boy seeing his father incarcerated.

It is virtually impossible to fight a divorce when you're in prison and not getting out soon. Our assets, never much to begin with, were depleted after an eighteen-month pounding by the federal government. We had lost everything but our child and our commitment to each other. The child was a rock; the commitment bit the dust. Dion“Exhilarating . . . surprising . . . ingenious.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times
 
The Racketeer is guilty of only one thing: keeping us engaged until the very last page.”—USA Today
 
“A satisfying, deeply engrossing thriller in which different forms of justice are ultimately served.”—The Washington Post
 
“Fast-paced . . . with enough startling plot twists—and changes of scenery, from Miami to Montego Bay and beyond—to surprise even the most suspicious reader.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“Tautly plotted.”—Entertainment Weekly

  •  

Connect With Us