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Stephen Coonts

Saucer

Stephen Coonts Saucer
$3.99 Pre-owned
 
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Series:

Saucer

Biographical note:

One of the world's premier thriller writers, Stephen Coonts has been flying all his adult life, and has written extensively about it. He lives in Nevada with his wife and son. Jake Grafton, the hero of Coonts' military thrillers and one of the most popular and recognizable characters in fiction, will continue to appear in Coonts' upcoming books, available from St. Martin's Press.

Excerpt from book:

SAUCER (Chapter 1)

RIP CANTRELL WAS HOLDING THE STADIA ROD, TRYING TO blink away the sweat trickling into his eyes, when a bright flash of light caught his eye. The light was to his left, near the base of an escarpment almost a mile away.

Careful not to disturb the stadia rod, he turned his head to get a better view.

"Hold that thing still for a few more seconds, Rip."

The shout echoed off the rock formations and tumbled around in the clear desert air, rupturing the profound silence. Occasionally one could hear the deep rumble of a jet running high, but normally the only sound was the whisper of the wind.

Dutch Haagen was at the transit, reading the rod. He and Bill Taggart were the engineers surveying a line for a seismic shoot. Rip was the gofer, working a summer job before he returned to college in a few weeks.

Rip concentrated on holding the rod still. Fifteen seconds passed, then Dutch waved his arms.

Now Rip looked again for the bright spot of reflected light.

There! Shimmering in the hot desert air, at the base of that low cliff, maybe a mile to the north. The afternoon sun must be reflecting on something shiny.

But what?

Trash? Here in the central Sahara?

The three men were a hundred miles from the nearest waterhole, two hundred from the nearest collection of native mud huts. A twin-turboprop transport with fixed landing gear dropped them here three weeks ago. "Your nearest neighbors are at an archaeological dig about thirty miles west," the South African pilot said, and gestured vaguely. "Americans, I think, or maybe British."

As Rip thought about it now, it occurred to him that he hadn't seen a single piece of man-made trash since he arrived. Not a crushed Coke can, a snuff tin, a cigarette butt, or a candy wrapper. The Sahara was the cleanest place he had ever been.

He put the stadia rod on his shoulder and waited for Dutch to drive up.

"Had enough for today?" Haagen asked as Rip stowed the rod in the holder on the side of the Jeep.

"We could do a couple more shots, if you want."

Dutch wore khaki shorts and a T-shirt, was deeply tanned and pleasantly dirty. Water to wash with was a luxury. In his early thirties, Haagen had been surveying seismic lines for ten years. The job took him all over the world and paid good money, but at times he found it boring. "We've done enough for today," he said with a sigh.

Rip looked again for the flash from the sun's reflection as he got into the passenger's seat.

"Look at that, Dutch."

"Something shiny. Candy wrapper or piece of metal. Old truck, maybe. Maybe even a crashed plane. Found one of those once in this desert."

"Let's go look."

Dutch shrugged and put the Jeep in motion. Rip was still a kid. He hadn't burned out yet. The central Sahara was a big adventure for him, probably the biggest of his life.

"Did you find that plane around here, Dutch?"

"Closer to the coast, in Tunisia. Old German fighter plane. A Messerschmitt, as I recall. Pilot was still in the cockpit. All dried out like a mummy."

"Wow. What did you do?" Rip held on to the bouncing Jeep with both hands.

"Do?" Haagen frowned. "Took a few photos, I guess. Stuck my finger in some of the bullet holes--I remember that."

"Did you get a souvenir?"

"One of the guys pried something off the plane. I didn't. Didn't seem right, somehow. I

"Coonts knows how to write and build suspense." --The New York Times Book Review
 
"Tough to put down." --Publishers Weekly
 
"A comic, feel-good sf adventure." --Kirkus Reviews
 
"Coonts is a natural storyteller." --USA Today

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