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Eric Weisbard

Guns N' Roses' Use Your Illusion I & Ii

Eric Weisbard Guns N' Roses' Use Your Illusion I & Ii 33 1 3
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<div><br/><div>It was the season of the blockbuster. Between August 12 and November 26 1991, a whole slew of acts released albums that were supposed to sell millions of copies in the run-up to Christmas. Metallica, Michael Jackson, Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Garth Brooks, MC Hammer, and U2 - all were competing for the attention of the record-buying public at the same time. But perhaps the most attention-seeking act of all was Guns N Roses. Their albums <em>Use Your Illusion 1 and 2</em>, released on the same day, were both 75-minute sprawlers with practically the same cover design - an act of colossal arrogance. </div><br/><div> </div><br/><div>On one level, it worked. The albums claimed the top two chart positions, and ultimately sold 7 million copies each in the US alone. On another level, it was a disaster. This was an album that Axl Rose has been unable to follow up in fifteen years. It signaled the end of Guns N Roses, of heavy metal on the Sunset Strip, and the entire 1980s model of blockbuster pop/rock promotion. <em>Use Your Illusion</em> marked the end of rock as mass culture. <br/><br/>In this book, Eric Weisbard shows how the album has matured into a work whose baroque excesses now have something to teach us about pop and the platforms it raises and lowers, about a man who suddenly found himself praised to the firmament for every character trait that had hitherto marked him as an irredeemable loser. </div><br/><div> </div></div>>

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