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Jackie Chan Stefan Hammond Mike Wilkins

Sex And Zen & A Bullet In The Head: The Essential

Jackie Chan Stefan Hammond Mike Wilkins Sex And Zen & A Bullet In The Head The Essential
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Biographical note:

Authors Stefan Hammond and Mike Wilkins (co-author of The New Roadside America) met in the front row of San Francisco's now-shuttered Pagoda Palace Theater in 1987, where both had gone to watch The Ghost Snatchers. Now they share the results of their long devotion to the form. They give you their picks for which movies to rent, where to rent them in North America, what to look for once you do, and even film titles in Chinese characters. Zealously written and incredibly entertaining, Sex and Zen & A Bullet in the Head is the perfect companion to the over-the-edge mayhem of Hong Kong film.

Excerpt from book:

Chapter 1

Ten That Rip

We start things off with ten Hong Kong films that rip. The movies in this chapter are all extremely entertaining, well-made, accessible, and like nothing you've ever seen anywhere else. They should also demonstrate once and for all mat anyone Still thinking in terms of the old chopsocky stereotypes is just plain wrong.

This is not a "Ten Best" list. Picking the ten best is a never-ending flame war best played out over coffee or on the Internet's "alt.asian-movies" newsgroup. Instead, what we have tried to do is pick a great representative movie from some of the categories that we explore in more detail later in this book. As a result, we've included only one film each from auteurs John Woo, Tsui Hark, and Jackie Chan, even though a Ten Best list might contain multiple entries from any or all of them.

Not only are these "Ten That Rip" the films that we recommend finding first, they are also among the ones that are easiest to find. Some, like A Chinese Ghost Story and Naked Killer, are staples of the growing college and art house theater circuit. Most are available on both videotape and laser disc. And all can be found subtitled.

The Bride With White Hair

1993

Starring Brigitte Lin Chin-hsia, Leslie Cheung Kwok-wing, Elaine Lui Siu-ling, Francis Ng Chun-yu, Nam Kit Ying

Directed by Ronny Yu

Psychosexual drama loaded with rich visual textures and fast, furious action. Leslie Cheung plays Yi-hang, a martial arts master condemned to self-exile atop a snowy mountaintop. In flashback, his tale reveals a childhood spent learning sword technique. Young adulthood brings with it a moshpit coif and a bright future as the heir to the Chung Yuan organization -- a powerful alliance of eight clans.

But Yi-hang is not fond of the martial life, and longs for freedom from swords plunging through flesh. Into his life swirls a fierce, beautiful warrior (Brigitte Lin), who can rip people apart with her whip. They fall into thunderbolt love, consummating their obsession in a crystalline pool surrounded by stalactites -- their deadly careers forgotten in giggling, washed-innocent abandon. Yi-hang finds that his new girlfriend has no name and christens her Lien Ni-chang.

Ni-chang didn't have a name because she was raised by wolves (really) and is now sponsored in her lethal activities by a cult leader named Chi Wu-shuang. Chi is a back-to-back brother/sister Siamese twin, a creature burning with malevolent intent. The male half blisters with unrequited passion for the beautiful Ni-chang, while the female half mocks her brother as an unlovely abomination.

Ni-chang wants out of the cult so she can start a new life with Yi-hang, and offers herself to the male half of the monster in exchange for her release. But she can't even pretend to get excited by his slathering advances (yeesh), and the female twin on his back shrieks with derision as she realizes that Ni-chang will never be her brother's lover in any way, misshape, or form.

As punishment, a barefoot Ni-chang is forced to walk a gauntlet over jagged shards while her rabid fellow cult members club her. She survives, but the scorned Chi Wu-shuang resorts to scorch

John Woo Very informative and enlightening. A must for any serious film buff.

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